Confirmed measles case in Lane County

Confirmed measles case in Lane County
Posted on 11/01/2019

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Testing has confirmed two new measles cases in Oregon, one of whom resides in Lane County. Both patients traveled on the same flight into Portland International Airport as a confirmed measles case on Saturday, October 12. The Lane County patient was partially vaccinated.

 

In response, Lane County Public Health has activated its incident command system and is currently investigating potential exposure.

WHERE COULD PEOPLE HAVE BEEN EXPOSED?

 

At this time, there are four identified sites of possible exposure during the patient’s infectious period.

Monday, October 21:

  • 10:30 a.m.–1:00 p.m., Creswell Bakery,  182 S 2nd St., Creswell
  • 12:00 p.m.–4:00 p.m., Bier Stein, 1591 Willamette St., Eugene

 

Wednesday, October 23:

  • 4:00 p.m.–7:30 p.m., Blu Mist, 1400 Valley River Dr., Suite 130, Eugene
  • 6:00 p.m.–9:30 p.m., North Fork Public House, 2805 Shadowview Dr., Eugene

 

Additional sites may be added as the investigation continues.

 

IS THERE STILL DANGER OF EXPOSURE IN THOSE LOCATIONS?

 

No. Measles exposure is possible for up to 2 hours after an infected person leaves the location. None of the identified locations above are considered ongoing exposure risks.

 

WHAT ARE SYMPTOMS OF MEASLES?

 

Measles, also known as rubeola, is a potentially severe viral infection. Measles symptoms appear 7 to 18 days after contact with the virus and typically include high fever, cough, runny nose, and watery eyes. Measles rash appears 3 to 5 days after the first symptoms. It usually begins as flat red spots that appear on the face at the hairline and spread downward to the neck, trunk, arms, legs, and feet.

  • Small raised bumps may also appear on top of the flat red spots.
  • The spots may become joined together as they spread from the head to the rest of the body.
  • When the rash appears, a person’s fever may spike to more than 104° Fahrenheit

 

Additionally, tiny white spots (Koplik spots) may appear inside the mouth two to three days after symptoms begin.

 

IS MEASLES DANGEROUS?

 

Measles isn’t just a little rash. Measles can be dangerous, especially for babies and young children, as well as for pregnant women and those who have compromised immune systems (e.g., cancer and transplant patients, etc.).

 

HOW DOES MEASLES SPREAD?

 

Measles is very contagious. Measles spreads through the air when an infected person coughs or sneezes. It is so contagious that if one person has it, up to 9 out of 10 people around him or her will also become infected if they are not protected. A child can get measles just by being in a room where a person with measles has been, even up to two hours after that person has left. An infected person can spread measles to others even before knowing they have the disease—from four days before developing the measles rash through four days after the rash subsides.

 

WHAT SHOULD SOMEONE CONCERNED ABOUT EXPOSURE DO?

 

If someone believes they have been exposed to measles, they should contact their healthcare provider by phone before traveling to their provider’s office. Measles spreads quickly through the air. People who may have been exposed and who are showing symptoms should limit their contact with other people and public places until they can see their healthcare provider.

 

ARE VACCINES AVAILABLE AND EFFECTIVE?

 

The measles vaccine is very effective. Two doses of measles vaccine are about 97 percent effective at preventing measles if exposed to the virus. One dose is about 93 percent effective.

 

If someone has not been vaccinated, or may only be partially vaccinated, they should contact their healthcare provider and arrange to be vaccinated.

Visit Lane County Public Health for additional information.

More information is available on Oregon Health Authority's website.